Monday, 22 February 2016

If Facebook was older

"Thank you for letting me join the group. I'm a 22 year old male and have not been feeling well over the last year or so. I make frequent visits to the bathroom and my weight is dropping off. I'm currently 54kg which is not great when you are six foot tall. I went and saw my GP. He initially told me it was "nerves" and later changed that to "spastic colon" but having recently spent 10 days in Croydon's Mayday Hospital, undergoing tests, the diagnosis is now Crohn's disease. I've been prescribed steroids for the inflammation and codeine phosphate to slow my system down. I know that the disease has no cure and that if I'm unlucky I could end up having surgery. That's the bit that really scares me because the thought of going into hospital fills me with absolute dread. Just going there for a barium enema was bad enough...."

If Facebook was older, and had been around in 1978, I may well have posted the above. Nowadays I read similar stories from young adults, many also in their early twenties, explaining that they have been recently diagnosed and the impact that diagnosis has had upon them both physically and mentally. Some are truly heart rending. I tend to forget I was in a similar place all those years ago.

A few decades on and I am currently in clinical remission but not without a few related health issues arising along the way. I would like to hope that others, who have just started out along their Crohn's path, can achieve a similar sort of equilibrium sooner rather than later. I'm not naive enough to think I have achieved full closure as we all know that Crohn's can return when we least expect it.

I was determined to at least attempt a partial closure and to this end set out to write a book based on the story so far. With a "big" birthday nearly upon me it is 99% complete. A few finishing touches and that will be it. The next part of the challenge will be to publish it, another new skillset to learn. Watch this space.
The biggest difference between the year of my diagnosis and the present day is the availability of IBD information. When I was told "you have Crohn's" it was just something I would have to live with, take drugs for and, if I was unlucky, might end up needing surgery for. That was pretty much it. Nowadays, if you search the web for "Crohn's Disease" there are over 8,000,000 entries ranging from excellent, well written information sites at the top end of the scale down to the downright dubious ones which are only there to try and sell some miracle cure or diet to desperate sufferers. Then there are all the forums, FB pages and blogs (like this one) where anyone can air their opinions.

I was discussing this subject with my sister-in-law. She asked if I thought I was better off having spent many years in blissful ignorance rather than in information overload. She remarked that I had maintained a positive attitude throughout and thought that it must have helped coping with the disease. My immediate response was "I don't know". I can see the arguments from both sides but having given it further thought, on balance, blissful ignorance was probably best for me. Fortunately/unfortunately this is no longer an option.

As ever one train of thought leads to another. For instance, what should the patient expect from their consultant? At initial diagnosis should they be told the worst possible outcome or should all the tests results and procedures to be completed before going that far. I had reason to question this at the end of May 2012 when it was possible that I was (and still may be) suffering from PSC (Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis). To confirm the diagnosis needed a number of scans and biopsies to be carried out but before any of these happened the consultant was talking about needing a liver transplant. You can imagine how I felt, sitting on the edge of my hospital bed, to be confronted with those words. It takes a lot to faze me but even I didn't knw how to react. Having now had the tests it is possible that I have the beginnings of PSC but nothing definitive. Did I really need to have the threat of a transplant dangled before me? Was it all down to a lack of bedside manner? Can bedside manner be learned? (That would make a good subject for, maybe, a survey).

..and my other question - how should we respond to the newly diagnosed, or waiting to be diagnosed, IBD sufferers on SoMe? Personally I work on the basis of trying to be positive, as I have plenty of positives along with the not so good times. I have seen other respondees jump straight in with tales of multiple operations, months in hospital and relationship break-ups. The FB entry that prompted me to write this piece was from a new sufferer, along the lines - "I've got Crohn's; it will mean having an operation and ending up with a bag; my life is over." After many supportive comments one person responded with "if it's a choice between dying or having a bag then I know what I would choose." To me it seemed so insensitive.

I'm not denying that all these things can happen but should we really burden someone who is just coming to terms that they have the disease with all the potential "baggage" that may, or may not, come with it? After all, we all suffer in different ways; we all cope in different ways; we all survive in different ways.

I would like to know if you think I've got this all completely wrong or if you agree. Answers on a tweet to @crohnoid.